Folklore Archives

El Chupacabra

El Chupacabra

Chupacabra by chezarawolf

FROM: livescience.com

The chupacabra was a very recent addition to the Mysterious Monster Club, coming many decades after Bigfoot and the Loch Ness monster made their debuts. But only a few years after the chupacabra first appeared on the scene, the mystery was solved.

Bigfoot, the mysterious beast said to roam the North American wilderness, is named after what it leaves behind: big footprints. Bigfoot’s Hispanic cousin, the chupacabra, is also named for what it leaves behind: dead animals. Though goats are said to be its favorite prey (chupacabra means “goat sucker” in Spanish), it has have also been blamed for attacks on cats, rabbits, dogs, chickens, and other animals.

There are no known photographs of the beast, or even credible footprints. Instead, the chupacabra is known mostly through a few dozen eyewitness sightings and many dead animals. The chupacabra is probably the world’s best-known vampire after Dracula, and its victims are often claimed to have been found completely drained of blood.

Descriptions of chupacabra vary widely, but many accounts suggest that the creature stands about four to five feet tall. It has powerful legs that allow it to leap huge distances, long claws, terrifying, glowing red eyes, and distinctive spikes down its back. While some believe that chupacabra sightings date back to the 1970s or earlier, the monsteractually first appeared in 1995 in Puerto Rico; there are no records of any vampiric chupacabras before that time.

Read more here: http://www.livescience.com/24036-chupacabra-facts.html

Facebooktwitterpinterestinstagram

El Sombrerón

El Sobreron

El Sombrerón

FROM: http://www.quepasa.gt

Walking through the streets of La Antigua Guatemala, surely your curiosity and imagination have taken flight and you have wondered what things have happened here in this place, what stories have been told about those still-standing buildings, what moaning and groaning hides, whispering among the ruins, and what kind of footsteps have clattered along the cobblestones.

This is one of those stories that still echoes through the silent nights of the full moon, so if some day you wander through the market and beyond and let your feet take you into the La Recolección neighborhood, don’t panic; just let go and allow yourself to feel a bit of the history and the magic that makes this place what it is.

There, they tell of a character who goes out walking at dusk. Is it a man? Is it a goblin? Is it a demon? No one knows for sure, but among those who have seen and heard it – and among those who haven’t – all agree that it’s someone or something very small, dressed all in black with a big shiny belt. On its head, it wears a black hat that hides both its big eyes and its questionable intentions. The feet, encased in a pair of black boots, clomp loudly, and the nearby walls echo with the noise. Over its shoulder hangs a silver guitar.

They say that El Sombrerón (“The Big Hat,” also known as Tzizimite, which means “goblin”) makes mischief through the neighborhoods of the city with his four mules. Sometimes he rides people’s horses, making them gallop all night and wearing them out; sometimes he braids their tails and manes. But he also likes to make young girls fall in love with him, especially those with big eyes and long hair. He enchants them with his sweet voice and the beautiful melodies from his guitar. When they come to the window to see who it is, they become bewitched. He follows them; he braids their hair; they become unable to eat or sleep. They fall under his spell and his mules stay hitched to their houses, while he sings and dances for his beloved.

So if one day you, or a friend, are attracted to a sweet voice that drifts through a window and you feel the moon’s influence beginning to flow through your veins, remember these words, because there are many sombrerones and sombreronas ready to make their mischief.

 

Facebooktwitterpinterestinstagram